I know where you are right now.

Oh, how I do.

Look at me: You are not a bad mother.

Bad moments do not make bad mothers (This is a Lysa Terkheurst quote. Can’t claim it.)

You are not defined by the hissy-fit you just threw.

You are not who the voices in your head are telling you you are.

Your children are not going to be screwed up as adults. (Well, they might be but it won’t be because of your hissy-fit – it will be because we’re all a little screwed up and that’s why we need Jesus.)

But you ARE a human being.

You ARE going to lose it now and then because you’re disabled by the flesh.

And you ARE probably exhausted, running on empty, and hungry for healthy food and not just leftover nuggets from a finished lunch plate.

I know you’re torturing yourself with guilt. You’re wondering if you should have just gone the lifetime career route and not had children. When your children act-up, you’ll think of this time and blame it on your impatience or your propensity to yell or your quick fuse – because we’re moms and that’s what we do.

We mold our children – for better or worse.

Here’s the thing: it’s not what we do to screw-up that matters most. Everyone screws up. It’s a given because of that flesh disorder we all have.

What matters most is what we do AFTER we screw up.

There is no better time to teach your child about the need for a Savior than after you’ve just lost it.

It won’t make you weak to go to your child and admit you were wrong. It will make you incredibly strong. If we want our children to seek forgiveness and have humility, it’s the perfect opportunity to show ’em how it’s done.

They, too, will screw-up. They, too, need a Savior. And they, too, will enjoy their earthly lives so much more if they keep a forgiving heart filled with humility.

They need to see their mama does, too. They need to see you aren’t perfect (because do you know just how wonderful they think you are?). And they need to know it’s OK to make mistakes.

It is covered by grace and His is enough. 

Exhale, mama. All is not lost – but there’s much to be gained.

Love,

A Mom Who Loses It, Too